• PADI Advanced Open Water in Nusa Lembongan, Bali

     

    Advanced Open Water Lembongan

     

    The PADI Advanced Open Water Course is your chance to develop your dive skills and experiment with new types of diving. It’s exciting, fun, and there are a lot of awesome dives to choose from when you are diving in Bali.

    Imagine diving to 30 meters, swimming with manta rays, or even mastering the art of underwater photography. It’s all possible when you are diving Nusa Lembongan and our surrounding area of Nusa Penida. During your Advanced Course, you’ll make 5 incredible dives in Nusa Lembongan, which include some of the most famous dive sites in the Nusa Penida Marine Protected Area.

     

    Diving Nusa Penida
    Diving in Nusa Penida Marine Protected Area from Big Boat

     

    There are two required dives – a deep dive and an underwater navigation dive – and another three dives which you can choose from the following options –Drift diving, Peak Performance Buoyancy, Night diving, Underwater Naturalist, Fish ID, Boat Diving, Search and Recovery, Underwater Photography and Multilevel & Computer diving.

    Start your Advanced Open Water online now with PADI eLearning from home! Click HERE to sign up with PADI.

    In this Blog we will take a more in-depth look at the two mandatory dives and some of the options which we offer when you are diving Lembongan with us!

     

    Deep dive advanced
    Your PADI Advanced certification will certify you to dive to 30 metres

     

    Deep Dive: (Mandatory)

    Once you are certified as an Advanced Open Water Diver, you’ll be able to dive to a maximum depth of 30 meters, so it’s essential that you practise deep diving procedures during your course. In the theory section, you’ll look at depth and decompression issues as well as nitrogen narcosis. You’ll also learn how to plan dives before making one for yourself and discovering the amazing depths of scuba diving in Nusa Penida!

     

    Underwater Navigation: (Mandatory)

    Remember the compass skills from your open water course dives? The Underwater Navigation Adventure Dive refines your compass navigation skills, helps you better navigate using kick-cycles, visual landmarks and time. You’ll also discover some of the pitfalls of navigating underwater due to conditions and currents.

     

    Peak performance buoyancy
    Perfect your buoyancy skills in the Peak Performance Buoyancy dive

     

    Peak Performance Buoyancy Diving: (Optional)

    Are you still going up and down more than you’d like to? Do you use your air faster than your buddies? Do you have trouble staying still underwater? In the peak performance buoyancy dive, you’ll perfect your buoyancy skills. You’ll learn how to gauge the weights you need for diving, how to use breath control to fine tune your positioning, how to kick efficiently, and ultimately how to be more streamlined, comfortable and efficient underwater.

     

    Drift Diving: (Optional)

    There is no better place to learn drift diving than along Nusa Penida’s north coast. Drift diving is easy when you know how and it opens up a range of new dive sites. You’ll learn how to plan a drift dive and how to (literally) go with the flow. After making a drift diving entry and descent you’ll explore one of our favourite Nusa Penida dive sites and learn how to ‘read’ the currents along the way. At the end of the dive you’ll make a controlled ascent before being picked up by the boat.

     

    advanced open water
    From manta rays and turtles to Nemo, Nusa Lembongan has it all!

     

    Fish Identification: (Optional)

    Finding ‘that silver fish’ in marine life books is never easy so during the fish identification dive you’ll learn how to identify various families of fish by sight. You’ll learn how to record sightings including which features are most important to take note of in order to be able to identify the species later. You’ll find that the fish books which used to seem overwhelming suddenly make sense! With over 75% of the world’s tropical fish found at our dive sites, you’ll have plenty to learn!

    Night Diving: (Optional)

    Why limit yourself to seeing only the marine life that’s active during the day? As the sun goes down so many of Bali’s most cryptic critters come to life! You’ll learn how to plan a night dive, communicate with your buddy during a night dive, as well as mastering navigation at night. Be aware though… night diving can become strangely addictive! (Availability of night dives is subject to sea conditions and tides.)

     

    Advanced Open Water Lembongan
    Clownfish live in symbiosis with anemones. In the naturalist dive you’ll learn more about marine ecosystems

     

    Underwater Naturalist: (Optional)

    Many divers know the names of fish and various species found when scuba diving in Bali, but few divers know about the entire marine ecosystem, what it includes and how it all co-exists. During the underwater naturalist program you’ll extend your knowledge beyond fish to plants, corals, and the symbiotic relationships which hold the pieces of the puzzle together. This is a great dive for anyone interested in nature and eco-systems.

     

    Underwater Photography: (Optional)

    It’s hard to think of a better Instagram moment than when you are diving with manta rays or encounter a mola mola – which is definitely possible when you are diving in Nusa Penida. Say goodbye to blurry and blue images and say hello to crisper focus and colour! In this optional dive you’ll put into practice the SEA method (shoot, evaluate, adjust) and you’ll learn camera and housing preparation for dives, how to use underwater lights, camera settings, how to read histograms and invaluable underwater shooting techniques for capturing even the flightiest of fish!

     

    advanced open water lembongan
    Capture stunning images in the underwater photography dive

     

    Search and Recovery Diving: (Optional)

    In this adventure dive you’ll learn a variety of underwater search patterns and when to use each one and you’ll learn techniques for using a lift bag for lifting negatively buoyant objects off the bottom. During your dive you’ll put these techniques into practice – which is a rewarding challenge and a lot of fun! This is a great choice for anyone who plans to make underwater cleanup dives, or enter the diving industry on a professional or commercial level.

    Boat Diving: (Optional)

    Do you know your stern from your starboard? Learn to identify the parts of dive boats, boat diving entries and exits, signaling for boats on the surface – and the best bit of this option? Dives from our luxurious, traditional Big Boat or one of our speedy speedboats!

     

    world diving lembongan
    Learn more about diving from either big boat or one of our speed boats in the boat diving option

     

    Multilevel and Computer Diving: (Optional)

    When diving Nusa Lembongan and Nusa Penida we are most often diving on sloping reefs which are ideal for practising multilevel diving. A multilevel dive allows you to explore more of a dive site and have longer and safer dives than staying at depth. You’ll plan your multilevel dive then you’ll lead your instructor from level to level according to your plan! You’ll also learn how to read your dive computer (we will provide one if you do not have your own),  how to use it for dive planning, and how to retrieve dive information for your logbook after diving.

     

    Advanced Open Water
    Lembongan sunsets are the perfect way to end a day of diving in Nusa Lembongan

     

    Advanced Open Water Schedule with World Diving

    Remember the reading and theory from the open water course? The good news is that the Advanced has far less and we usually complete the course in 2 days.

    If you opt for eLearning there is a quick review (quiz) on your first day and you may need to read additional sections in the manual according to your dive choices.

    For divers taking the complete Advanced Open Water in Lembongan, there are 5 chapters to read (one for each dive) and some theory questions to review with your instructor. There is no exam for the Advanced Open Water course and reading can be done in afternoons or evenings when you are not diving.

     

    Advanced Open Water
    2 days of incredible diving, developing your dive skills, and a lot of fun!

     

    Our *2 day schedule includes a morning boat trip each day and one afternoon dive. During your 2 dive morning trips you’ll head over to Nusa Penida and dive Bali’s most vibrant and healthy coral reefs – if conditions are good you might even explore the most famous sites of Manta Point and Crystal Bay!

    You’ll dive from either our spacious traditional Big Boat or one of our smaller, speedier speedboats. A light lunch is provided during the surface interval on all boats in between dives.

    (*Scheduling is flexible to account for sea conditions, whether you opt for eLearning or theory in Lembongan, your arrival time on the first day, and your chosen dive options. To be safe, you should allow 2.5 days to complete your program)


    advanced elearning lembongan

    SPECIAL OFFER!

    Start your Advanced Open Water online now with PADI eLearning: Click HERE to sign up with PADI now.

    Book your course with us before the end of July (and pay your deposit) and we’ll give you a 30% discount in Lembongan PLUS free accommodation during your course!

    (If you can’t travel due to COVID19 we will also change your dates at no extra cost).


    Are you ready to take the plunge and become a PADI Advanced Open Water Diver? For more information or to make a reservation click here or send us an email to [email protected]  and we’ll get right back to you.

    We look forward to scuba diving in Lembongan with you soon!

     

     

  • Magic, Wooden Nails and a Very Large Hammer!

    Wooden Nails

    Building Big Boat was labour intensive, to say the least.  We had an industrious group of nail makers consisting of anyone who dropped by to have a chat. The rule of the shed  was that if you popped in, you were given a block of iron wood and an axe.  It seemed that everyone in the village just loved whittling! I was the only exception to this rule.  The thought of me wielding one of the axes made the crew a tad anxious!

    Magic Uri Geller Style!

    In another corner of the boat yard, Pak Gandy had started his magic.  He had lashed two boards together to a tree and anointed them with his magic potion, water and palm oil. A a smoldering fire was lit  in a pit beneath them. At the other end of the boards were palm logs providing the weight to gently twist the boards through ninety degrees.  The fire was kept going 24 hours and each day the planks would twist a little more. Our Pak Gandi was a regular Uri Geller!

    Screwing and Gluing

    Meanwhile the main crew were now fastening the hull planking to the keel, transom and main rib.  The edges of the boards were drilled at regular intervals, a generous dollop of epoxy was rammed in the holes followed by hand crafted nails. Corresponding holes were drilled and filled with glue.  Then the two parts were gently introduced to each other with the assistance of an incredibly large hammer!

    Noah’s Tool Box!

    The bit that floored me the most though was the tool box.  With the exception of an electric drill and a chain saw, they had the same tools that could have come from my great grandad’s shed! I think there may have been a tape measure somewhere, but I never saw it.

    Big Boat was starting to take shape.  The twisted boards were cut to shape and fitted up against the prow and all of a sudden, a mad collection of hewn trees and telegraph poles started to look seaworthy.

    Next time – “They Grow Them Like that!”

     

  • Boat Building in the Jungle

    Pak Gandy sketching in the sand.

    Meet Pak Gandy, The Boat Building Guru!

    Welcome to the third installment of boat building Balinese style!

    The wood had been cut, prime binkarai planks had been delivered, plans had been drawn and approved and the boat yard in the jungle constructed……Enter the boat builders with three lengths of old telegraph pole, gallons of epoxy resin and a tool box donated by Noah!

    The question had to be asked.  What were the telegraph poles for?

    Re-claim, Re-cycle, Re-use!

    I should have known.  These were to be the backbone of our boat, the keel and prow.  Why telegraph poles? Because they are old seasoned iron wood and nigh on indestructible.  Having explained these salient points to me, our magnificent boat builder then squatted down with a pointy stick in hand and drew a large semicircle in the dirt.  He then looked me right in the eye and said assertively,

    “Like This!”

    What does one say? It turns out that he had just drawn the profile for the main rib of Big Boat, right where the central outriggers are. This was the piece around which all the planking would be bent.  I just nodded my head and let him get on with what he did best.

    Handy With His Chopper!

    The next thing I knew, he had a great baulk of timber propped up and was wielding a razor sharp axe, forming perfect joints which when completed went snugly together like pieces of an incredible three dimensional jigsaw.  I had heard of craftsmen like Pak Gandy, but to watch him and his team in action was a pure pleasure.

    As we were about to leave the boatyard, I noticed a rather large hole in the ground just next to a tree stump.  Pak Gandy’s merry men were dumping all the wood chips in there.  Pak Gandy grinned at me, pointed to the pit and whispered,

    “That’s for the magic!”

    It seems that boat builders come from Hogwarts!

    Next time – Magic, deadly potions, wooden nails and a very large hammer.

  • Come Up With A Plan! Designing Big Boat.

    Come up with a plans
    Come up with a plans

    Grand Designs.

    Made the Mad Axeman and the Timber Haulers had done their thing so the next step was to come up with a plan! Some serious designing was required. Suggestions came thick and fast. A stronger, longer ladder. A loo with a view. A captain’s chair. Even a water slide! You name it, it was suggested.

    So after scrapping some of the less practical suggestions, out came the set squares, protractors and sharp 2H pencils and the drawing commenced. Now I may have mentioned that my knowledge of boat building was limited to something you could fold from paper and float in the bath, as a result, the task of designing a sodding great 15 metre wooden boat was somewhat daunting.  Nevertheless, after a couple of weeks and much head scratching, a reasonable facsimile of a set of plans were produced.

    Construction Crew Consultation.

    Meanwhile, Pak Nyoman had found our trusty boat builder, the incredible Pak Gandy.  We were formally introduced and I humbly submitted my design.  The boat captains, led by Pak Lombang, boat builders and various hangers on all peered at the plans and there was a long silence. The suspense was killing me. Cigarettes were passed round, cups of coffee consumed, various aspects of the design were pontificated over and, after what seemed an eternity there was a mass nodding of heads. At last the verdict was pronounced.

    “Bagus!”

    Then the plans were neatly folded and …….never, ever looked at again!

    Boatyard in the Jungle.

    There just remained the question of where the boat would be built.  For some unfathomable reason, the location for our boatyard was in the jungle, nearly 200 meters from the sea!  I did question this choice but was reassured that this was a very fortuitous site, approved of by the deities of boat builders.

    There was one other slight problem.  Because rainy season was in full force,  workers, timbers and tools would soon end up soaking wet and like my wet suit, ever so slightly mouldy! So a suitable tent had to be built.  Therefore the greenery was cut back, bamboo sacrificed to the cause and a spidery structure was erected, covered in canvas and lashed to nearby trees. Finally the finishing touch was the installation of the temple and that was it, we were ready to go!

    In our next thrilling instalment, “Pak Gandy scribbles in the sand!”

  • Building Big Boat, “TIMBER!”

     

     

     

    Cutting wood for for the frame

    How To Build  A Boat!

    When we bought World Diving in 2005 we knew that the original Big Boat was getting close to retirement age and that a new boat would have to be found.  This was evident by a couple of facts.  First, the water in the bilge was slopping over the deck boards! Second, the daylight that could be seen through cracks in the hull!

    After much scratching of heads and long discussions we decided to build a new one!

    We consulted our expert in all things boat like, Pak Lombang and he said,

    “Kayu! Harus adah kayu kuat! Saya adah banyak!” Loosely translated this means, you need strong wood. I have lots in my garden. What he failed to mention is that it was still alive and growing!

    The Hunt for Wood!

    So, Pak Made was sought after as he had the largest chain saw on the island. This thing was a beast!  It had a blade over a metre long with the most vicious chain you have ever seen.  This was the Mad Max of island saws!

    So off we ventured into the jungle, also known as Pak Lombang’s garden. At this stage, Sue and I were having qualms about hacking down trees, but we were assured that these trees were on Pak lombang’s land and had been planted with boat building in mind.

    Suitable trees were identified and duly dispatched by Made’s rusty Stihl.  Then came the truly terrifying part. Making sure that he had his protective footwear firmly in place, flip flops with a thick sole, and his eye protectors on, copy RayBans from Kuta, Mad Made started sectioning the trees into suitable lumber.  This involved standing on the tree trunk and using this vast chain saw with a somewhat loose chain to saw thick baulks of wood with his feet either side of the cut. At this stage we walked away!

    Needless to say, everyone else was perfectly comfortable with the levels of health and safety being followed by our heroic hacker and Made even proudly showed off his ten toes at the end of the day!

    Finally, all the required wood had been cut and sectioned and was then stacked up to dry for a month. Then came the next challenge.

    “Pak John, we need a plan, design the boat!” an interesting concept as my boat building expertise to date had involved nothing more challenging than playing Pooh Sticks!

    In the next thrilling installment, “Shipyard in the Jungle,” Johnny Makes A Plan!

  • Beat the Winter Blues and Splash into the New Year

    Tired of the dark grey winter mornings? Desperate for some sunshine and scuba dives? Planning to make a new years resolution to dive more? Planning to take your next level of PADI Course? We are here to help! Dive with World Diving Lembongan during February and March and we’ll give you an instant 10% discount!

     

    Christmas turtle

     

    That’s right, we are offering 10% discount on our daily dive trips, dive and stay packages and PADI courses.

    There is no better time to dive with us than through the winter! Did you know this is also when the water temperature is at its warmest and the dive sites are quieter meaning incredible marine life encounters without other divers!

     

    Jukung Balinese World Diving

     

    Are you an Indonesian National or expat living in Indonesia? Combine your WNI / KITAS 10% discount with our winter savings discount for a massive 20% off trips, courses and packages!

    Pondok-baruna-Sea-view-beach

     

    See you soon in sunny Nusa Lembongan.

    [email protected]

  • New PADI Students

    A Word on Masks -Which mask suits you sir?

    A Word on Masks.

    There you are, a newly fledged PADI Open Water Diver, and you start looking at all the wonderful stuff you can now buy to go with that shiny new C-card.  So what is and is not worth buying? The first thing I would consider are masks.  There is nothing more frustrating than having a mask that leaks and there is nothing more repellent than a mask full of mould that with fraying straps and raggedy seals.

    Modern diving equipment
    For masks, comfort and a good fit is important!

    Comfort and Fit!

    As I said in the article about wetsuits, the most important thing about any equipment is a good fit.  Your mask has to be comfortable as you are going to have this thing on your face for at least an hour.  Masks come in all sorts of shapes and sizes so the first thing to do is find masks that are the right width for your face.  This may even mean trying on masks for children if you have a particularly narrow face.

    Then you need to do the fit test. Without using the strap, put the mask against you face and sniff! You should find that the mask sticks to your face like a demented limpet and holds itself in place. Guys with beards may find this will not happen. Unfortunately air can get back into the mask via your 6 o’clock shadow!

    Where is the rub?

    Now that you have seen that the mask fits, just push it against you face a little more firmly and see if there are any parts of the mask that feels uncomfortable. Remember, water pressure can make the mask fit tighter. I find that certain makes have a hard plastic frame that pushes against the bridge of my nose.  After wearing one of these masks for a day I actually had a bruise where the mask had been pressing on my face. On another occasion, one guest had the firm imprint of a screw head at the end of her nose. This was where the drain valve of her mask was making contact!

    Little Black Number!

    Next is the style of mask. There are so many options out there, but you are ideally looking for a low volume mask.  That is a mask that does not have too much air space on the inside.  These are generally easier to clear. If you need corrective lenses, you will need to look for a twin lensed mask like the Technisub LOOK.  You can buy the corrective lenses for this mask and have the dive shop fit them for you.

    New PADI Students
    The mask sniff test in action!

    After all this you can now go about selecting the colour so that it synchronises with your beach wear! As most wetsuits are black, I decided that this would be my colour of choice, but I am an old traditionalist.  One thing about skirts….. the one on the mask!  If you are a keen photographer, a black silicone material is better as this reduces glare inside the mask and makes it easier to see the screen of your camera.

    So there you have it, fit and comfort, no funny screws and a dark skirt. What could be clearer?

  • Penida Manta Point Bali

    The Mantas are Back!

    manta solo manta PADI

    After a few weeks of absence our wonderful manta rays are back in full force.  After an extended period of big swells which kept us away from Batu Lumbung, Manta Point,  we ventured down the coast yesterday.  The waves were still crashing against the rocks on the way down, and recent reports had been not hopeful, so we did not know what to expect when we went over the side!

    We were not disappointed.  They were every where and had obviously regained their joie de vivre!  They were chasing, swirling, cleaning and even playing peek a boo with the divers behind the corals!  It still blows me away when I turn around and find a manta has snuck up behind me and is inches away with a huge grin on its face.

    After an hour of diving with these gorgeous creature it was time for us to get back on big boat.  We were all reluctant to leave and will be back as soon as possible as the sea is calm for the next few days.

    Why don’t you join us?

    Manta Ray, Manta Point Bali
    Manta Ray, Manta Point Bali